Sō Percussion

Sō Percussion

 
Sō Percussion

Tuesday, February 3, 7:30pm
at SFJAZZ Center, Miner Auditorium

Sō Percussion
Percussion Masters Series: Sō Percussion  

Sō Percussion

The acclaimed Brooklyn quartet of masterful percussionists brings an engaging night of rhythm, surprise and delight in their SFJAZZ debut. Transcending the traditional idea of a percussion ensemble, Sō Percussion embraces the spirit of adventure and revels in the unexpected. Their combination of unpredictable musicality and stage theatrics have garnered them a fervent following comparable to a buzz-worthy indie rock band. Formed in 1999 by students at the Yale School of Music, Sō Percussion’s original mission was to perform the 20th century percussion music by composers John Cage, Steve Reich, Iannis Xenakis, and others. As their reputation and popularity grew, the quartet expanded their repertoire to include commissions from a number of prominent composers including Steve Mackey and Paul Lansky, and in 2006, the group members began contributing their own compositions. They have collaborated with artists ranging from Medeski Martin and Wood and trumpeter Dave Douglas to Wilco drummer Glen Kotche, electronic duo Matmos and rockers The Dirty Projectors, and appeared on a dozen recordings including Steve Reich’s WTC 9/11 with the Kronos Quartet and Cage 100: The Bootleg Series LP, a multi-format commemoration of John Cage’s centennial year. Sō Percussion’s latest, Ryonen, is a collaboration with drummer Kid Millions of the eclectic band Oneida.

Artist Personnel

Eric Beach percussion
Josh Quillen percussion
Adam Sliwinski percussion
Jason Treuting percussion

Artist Website

"Through a mix of consummate skill and quirky charm, this mercurial quartet has helped to ignite an explosive new enthusiasm for percussion music old and new. " — The New York Times
"The range of colors and voices that Sō Percussion coaxes from its menagerie is astonishing and entrancing. " — Billboard
"an exhilarating blend of precision and anarchy, rigor and bedlam " — The New Yorker