Ornette Coleman — CANCELLED

Ornette Coleman — CANCELLED

Ornette Coleman

Friday, November 9, 8:00pm
at Davies Symphony Hall

Ornette Coleman
Sound Grammar Series: Jazz Giants  

We regret to announce that our Ornette Coleman performance scheduled for Friday, November 9 at Davies Symphony Hall has been cancelled due to travel restrictions related to recent illness. If you purchased tickets via credit card, the card used for purchase will be automatically refunded the total amount, but if you have any questions, please contact the SFJAZZ Box Office at 415-788-7353 or boxoffice@sfjazz.org.

Ornette Coleman

More than 50 years after Ornette Coleman changed the course of music with The Shape of Jazz to Come, the avant-garde patriarch remains an elusive genius whose work defies neat categories. While he coined the term “free jazz” with his classic 1960 double quartet album Free Jazz: A Collective Improvisation, he’s a composer of expansive ambition whose tunes have become essential touchstones in the jazz canon. His melodic imagination often seems limitless, as he regularly introduces dozens of new tunes with slippery, careening singsong lines. And though he’s known as one of the most sophisticated and controversial innovators in jazz, his music is equally steeped in the raw looseness of the blues. He has performed often for SFJAZZ, including the 1994 premiere of his dazzling multimedia work, Tone Dialing. Attesting to the timeless influence of his compositions, the SFJAZZ Collective chose Coleman as tribute artist during their 2004 inaugural season. In 2007, he became only the second jazz musician ever to win a Pulitzer Prize. Ornette’s quartet of the past eight years, powered by his son, drummer Denardo Coleman, and featuring bassists Tony Falanga and Greg Cohen, produces some of the most memorable music of his epic career.

Artist Personnel

Ornette Coleman alto saxophone
Greg Cohen bass
Tony Falanga bass
Denardo Coleman drums

Artist Website

"He blazed onto the scene like some alien object hurtling into the atmosphere, and the force of his impact shook the ground. " — JazzTimes
"One of the last of the truly imposing figures from a generation of jazz players that was full of them. " — The New York Times
"He remains a restless free spirit on the frontiers of jazz. " — People