Ralph Carney

Ralph Carney

 
Ralph Carney

Sunday, June 23, 5:00pm
at Church of the Advent

Ralph Carney
Solo Series: Solo Sacred Space  

Ralph Carney

Straddling the line between jazz virtuoso and eccentric genius, woodwind master Ralph Carney has been a ubiquitous presence in pop, experimental music and jazz for over 30 years. The Akron Ohio native honed his expansive approach in the 70s as part of Woodstock’s Creative Music Studio that supported other boundary-pushing figures including reed master Anthony Braxton, pianist Cecil Taylor and trumpeter Don Cherry. Carney became one of the most in-demand horn players in the session scene of the 80s and 90s, adding his singular style to records with the B-52s, Frank Black, Elvis Costello, Marc Ribot, William S. Burroughs and producer Hal Willner. It was during this time that Carney met Tom Waits and subsequently appeared on some of Waits’ greatest albums, including Rain Dogs, Frank’s Wild Years and Bone Machine, and had a featured role in Waits’ big screen concert film Big Time. A Bay Area resident since the mid-80s, Carney has continued to lend his talents to a litany of artists including his younger cousin Patrick’s band, The Black Keys. He began releasing a number of highly personal albums under his own name in the 90s, and most recently has been leading his Serious Jass Project, culminating in the group’s 2011’s release, Seriously. He brings a soulful mix of the arcane and the experimental to this solo performance.

Artist Personnel

Ralph Carney woodwinds

Artist Website

"...Carney playing spoons as if they were castanets then shifting to a weird twin-reed instrument that looks like an iris stalk and sounds like nothing else. Sometime along the way the irrepressible Carney plays a couple of instruments at once, blows on a musette, sings Noh vocals, plays a slide clarinet and slide whistle and is otherwise incorrigible. " — San Francisco Examiner
"Ralph's great... He's guided by some other source of information. He's like a broken toy that works better than before it was broken. " — Tom Waits