Eddie Daniels & Roger Kellaway

Eddie Daniels & Roger Kellaway

Eddie Daniels
& Roger Kellaway

Thursday, July 18, 7:30pm
at SFJAZZ Center, Miner Auditorium

Eddie Daniels

Eddie Daniels & Roger Kellaway

Eddie Daniels
& Roger Kellaway

Thursday, July 18, 7:30pm
at SFJAZZ Center, Miner Auditorium

Roger Kellaway

Eddie Daniels & Roger Kellaway

Two of jazz’s most fluent and elegant improvisers, clarinetist Eddie Daniels and pianist Roger Kellaway, play Duke Ellington’s sublime and swinging music in a duet format ideally suited to the intimacy and acoustical refinement of SFJAZZ’s Miner Auditorium.

 

Over the course of a five-decade career, Eddie Daniels has set the standard for excellence on clarinet and tenor saxophone, first coming to prominence in 1966 as part of the legendary Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra during its inception at New York’s Village Vanguard. His résumé includes recordings with trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, saxophonist Yusef Lateef and guitarist George Benson as well as a stellar output of releases as a leader. Equally at home in jazz and classical settings, the Julliard alum has been praised by no less an authority than Leonard Bernstein, who described him as “a thoroughly well-bred demon.”

 

Roger Kellaway’s career has made him an icon among jazz fans, musicians and filmgoers. A true virtuoso, he has lent his inimitable keyboard talent to work with Sonny Rollins, Ben Webster, Bob Brookmeyer, Carmen McRae, Al Cohn & Zoot Sims, and Don Ellis. He won a Grammy for his arrangement of Eddie Daniels’ Memos From Paradise, and is equally regarded as a composer, receiving an Oscar nomination for his score to Barbra Streisand’s A Star Is Born and composing the unforgettable closing theme to TV’s All In The Family.

Artist Personnel

Eddie Daniels clarinet, tenor saxophone
Roger Kellaway piano

"It is a rare event in jazz where one man can all but reinvent an instrument, bringing it to a new stage of revolution. " — Leonard Feather on Eddie Daniels
"Roger Kellaway has the kind of monumental piano technique for which it is hard to find analogues. (He) can knock you flat and run you over while sounding like he has the gas pedal halfway down. " — JazzTimes