Lavay Smith

Lavay Smith

Lavay Smith

& Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers
with special guests Freddie Hughes and Big Bones

Swingin’ the Blues: The Kansas City Sound

Saturday, November 10, 8:00pm
at YBCA Forum

Lavay Smith

Lavay Smith

Lavay Smith

& Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers
with special guests Freddie Hughes and Big Bones

Swingin’ the Blues: The Kansas City Sound

Saturday, November 10, 8:00pm
at YBCA Forum

Freddie Hughes
Almost Sold Out

Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers

San Francisco vocalist Lavay Smith brings a touch of the blues to everything she sings. Now, the sensuous chanteuse and her hard-swinging band work their alchemy on a program that explores the real Kansas City sound. As a wide-open town that served as a hub for territory bands crisscrossing the Midwest in the 1930s, Kansas City boasted one of the nation’s formative jazz scenes, eventually giving rise to the famed big bands of Jay McShann and Count Basie. Backed by her evergrooving Skillet Lickers, with some of the Bay Area’s best musicians, Smith interprets the bawdy and uproariously swinging blues made famous by clarion vocalists like Big Joe Turner and Jimmy Rushing. The Skillet Lickers are led by pianist, arranger and founding member Chris Siebert, a bona fide authority on swing, jazz and blues. The band also features Danny Armstrong, a tremendous trombonist and singer, and ferocious saxophone battles between Robert Stewart and Jules Broussard, the latter a Bay Area jazz hero since the 1960s. Like several other artists in this 30th Anniversary Festival, Lavay Smith has appeared with SFJAZZ many times across the decades.

Artist Personnel

Lavay Smith vocals
Freddie Hughes vocals
Big Bones vocals
Danny Armstrong vocals, trombone
Jules Broussard alto saxophone
Robert Stewart tenor saxophone
Mike Olmos trumpet
Chris Siebert piano
Nat Johnson bass
Howard Wiley drums

Artist Website

"Hands-down the best thing to come out of the jump/swing revival... the gal can sing her tail off. " — Seattle Times
"A singular ensemble that puts a soulful stamp on a huge swath of American music. " — Boston Globe