Savion Glover & Bare Soundz

Savion Glover & Bare Soundz

Savion Glover

& Bare Soundz

Saturday, November 5, 7:00pm · 9:00pm
at Palace of Fine Arts Theatre

Savion Glover

Savion Glover & Bare Soundz

Savion Glover

& Bare Soundz

Saturday, November 5, 7:00pm · 9:00pm
at Palace of Fine Arts Theatre

Savion Glover and Bare Soundz

PARKING ALERT: We'd like to inform you that construction currently affects several streets near the Palace of Fine Arts. For recommended routes and info about nearby parking, please visit the Palace of Fine Arts website. Please allow for extra time to find parking.

Savion Glover & Bare Soundz

In recent years, Savion Glover has performed for SFJAZZ with piano titan McCoy Tyner’s trio, as well as with The Otherz, a Coltrane- inspired project that moved tap out of the rhythm section and onto the front line. But with Bare Soundz, Glover strips the art of tap down to rhythmic essentials. They dispense with other instruments entirely, showcasing an ensemble of tap masters who generate melodies, bass lines and of course percussion, entirely with their feet and hands. It’s a tall order, but Glover has been boldly breaking new ground for 25 years. Only 12 when he appeared on Broadway in The Tap Dance Kid, Glover made his film debut alongside mentor Gregory Hines and Sammy Davis Jr. in 1989’s Tap. A regular on Sesame Street from 1990-95, he became a cultural phenomenon in 1996 when George C. Wolfe showcased his dazzling rhythmic dexterity in Bring in ‘da Noise, Bring in ‘da Funk (which earned a Tony Award for Best Choreography). There are precious few artists who embody, redefine, and radically expand their art form, but Glover stands tall as an elemental creative force who has returned tap to its roots while opening up vast expanses for fresh exploration. As such, we include him among this fall’s “jazz giants” — not a category we take lightly!

Artist Personnel

Savion Glover hoofer
Marshall Davis Jr. hoofer
Keitaro Hosokawa hoofer

"To see Mr. Glover dance is to see a virtuosic and authentic artist at work. " — The New York Times
"The greatest tap-dancer to ever lace up a pair of tap shoes. " — Gregory Hines