Miguel Zenón with Luis Perdomo & Paoli Mejias

Miguel Zenón with Luis Perdomo & Paoli Mejias

Miguel Zenón duos

with Luis Perdomo & Paoli Mejias

Sunday, June 2, 7:30pm
at SFJAZZ Center, Miner Auditorium

Resident Artistic Director Miguel Zenón

Miguel Zenón with Luis Perdomo & Paoli Mejias

Miguel Zenón duos

with Luis Perdomo & Paoli Mejias

Sunday, June 2, 7:30pm
at SFJAZZ Center, Miner Auditorium

Luis Perdomo

Miguel Zenón with Luis Perdomo & Paoli Mejias

Miguel Zenón duos

with Luis Perdomo & Paoli Mejias

Sunday, June 2, 7:30pm
at SFJAZZ Center, Miner Auditorium

Paoli Mejias

Miguel Zenón duos with Luis Perdomo & Paoli Mejias

Miguel Zenón's residency closes with an evening of duos featuring Venezuelan-born pianist Luis Perdomo (a founding member of Zenón’s quartet) and Puerto Rican percussion maestro Paoli Mejias, a program that concludes with all three musicians on stage.

About Miguel Zenón

As a founding member of the SFJAZZ Collective in 2004, Miguel Zenón was a conspicuously talented, largely unknown 27-year-old saxophonist getting set to release his second album. Almost a decade later, Zenón is the most celebrated altoist of his generation, a multi Grammy nominee and Guggenheim and MacArthur “Genius” Fellow who has extended jazz’s conceptual reach with a series of albums exploring the music of Puerto Rico, where he was born. Deepening his relationship with SFJAZZ as a Resident Artistic Director, Zenón presents a series of projects that showcase his ever-expanding vision as a composer inspired by West Africa and an ingenious interpreter of the folkloric and popular music of Puerto Rico.

Artist Personnel

Miguel Zenón alto saxophone
Luis Perdomo piano
Paoli Mejias percussion

Artist Website

"This young musician and composer is at once reestablishing the artistic, cultural, and social tradition of jazz while creating an entirely new jazz language for the 21st century. " — MacArthur Foundation
"The instrumental prowess of Zenon's playing, the vigor of his compositions and the sensitivity of his band to Puerto Rican song forms point to new possibilities in jazz " — Chicago Tribune