Watch: Jazz & Race Live Panel Discussion

WATCH: JAZZ & RACE LIVE PANEL DISCUSSION

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Sunday, February 28, 2021 • 11 AM–1 PM PT (2–4 PM ET)

Hosted by Claude Steele
w/ Terri Lyne Carrington, Nate Chinen, Angela Davis, and Rhiannon Giddens
Includes Q&A Session

On February 28, 2021, SFJAZZ presented a two hour online panel discussion that examined the current state of jazz, race, and gender, hosted by educator, author, and SFJAZZ Board Trustee Claude Steele. Panelists for this discussion included four world-renowned artists and writers with unique perspectives on the subject, including 2021 NEA Jazz Master, composer, and drummer Terri Lyne Carrington, critic and author Nate Chinen, author and educator Angela Davis, and multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Rhiannon Giddens

If you enjoy the discussion, we encourage you to explore our other online offerings from SFJAZZ Digital, including our weekly Fridays at Five broadcasts, which are free to SFJAZZ Members and take place every Friday at 5 PM PT, as well as on demand concerts, livestreams and more. Visit SFJAZZ.org/Digital to learn more. 

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Read SFJAZZ's Racial Equity Action And Change Statement

Meet the Panelists

TERRI LYNE CARRINGTON

One of the her generation’s master drummers, Carrington transcended her prodigious beginnings, receiving a full scholarship to Boston’s Berklee College of Music at age 11, to become a highly respected bandleader, an in-demand producer, an invaluable rhythm section player, and a three-time GRAMMY Award winner. She has had lengthy musical associations with Wayne Shorter, Esperanza Spalding, and Herbie Hancock, and her most recent album, Waiting Game, is a politically charged project tackling subjects of racism, homophobia, gender equality, mass incarceration, and police brutality.

TERRI LYNE CARRINGTON

One of the her generation’s master drummers, Carrington transcended her prodigious beginnings, receiving a full scholarship to Boston’s Berklee College of Music at age 11, to become a highly respected bandleader, an in-demand producer, an invaluable rhythm section player, and a three-time GRAMMY Award winner. She has had lengthy musical associations with Wayne Shorter, Esperanza Spalding, and Herbie Hancock, and her most recent album, Waiting Game, is a politically charged project tackling subjects of racism, homophobia, gender equality, mass incarceration, and police brutality.

Nate Chinen

A thirteen-time winner of the Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Excellence in Writing from the Jazz Journalists Association, Chinen spent nearly a dozen years as a jazz and pop critic for The New York Times before joining WBGO as Director of Editorial Content in 2017, where he works closely with programs including Jazz Night in America and The Checkout. He wrote a long-running monthly column for JazzTimes, is co-author of impresario George Wein’s autobiography Myself Among Others: A Life in Music, and wrote 2018’s Playing Changes: Jazz For the New Century — a work that explores jazz’s place in the lives of Black musicians and audiences, and how that relationship has evolved over the years..

Nate Chinen

A thirteen-time winner of the Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Excellence in Writing from the Jazz Journalists Association, Chinen spent nearly a dozen years as a jazz and pop critic for The New York Times before joining WBGO as Director of Editorial Content in 2017, where he works closely with programs including Jazz Night in America and The Checkout. He wrote a long-running monthly column for JazzTimes, is co-author of impresario George Wein’s autobiography Myself Among Others: A Life in Music, and wrote 2018’s Playing Changes: Jazz For the New Century — a work that explores jazz’s place in the lives of Black musicians and audiences, and how that relationship has evolved over the years..

Angela Davis

An author, activist, educator, and Civil Rights icon, Davis has authored 10 books that cover race, feminism, class, and the U.S. prison system including If They Come in the Morning: Voices of Resistance, Women, Race and Class, Blues Legacies and Black Feminism, and Freedom is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundations of a Movement. Her ties to music are deep, with jazz artists Herbie Hancock, Lee Morgan, Todd Cochran, Phil Ranelin, and Sons of Kemet dedicating compositions to her, as did pop legends John Lennon and the Rolling Stones. She is currently a Distinguished Professor Emerita at University of California, Santa Cruz, and participated in SFJAZZ Resident Artistic Director Marcus Shelby’s June 2020 Fridays at Five streaming concert devoted to her book Blues Legacies and Black Feminism.

Angela Davis

An author, activist, educator, and Civil Rights icon, Davis has authored 10 books that cover race, feminism, class, and the U.S. prison system including If They Come in the Morning: Voices of Resistance, Women, Race and Class, Blues Legacies and Black Feminism, and Freedom is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundations of a Movement. Her ties to music are deep, with jazz artists Herbie Hancock, Lee Morgan, Todd Cochran, Phil Ranelin, and Sons of Kemet dedicating compositions to her, as did pop legends John Lennon and the Rolling Stones. She is currently a Distinguished Professor Emerita at University of California, Santa Cruz, and participated in SFJAZZ Resident Artistic Director Marcus Shelby’s June 2020 Fridays at Five streaming concert devoted to her book Blues Legacies and Black Feminism.

Rhiannon Giddens

Singer, violinist, banjo player, actress, GRAMMY-winner, and 2017 MacArthur Foundation “Genius Grant” recipient, Giddens is a founding member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, and has released a succession of albums as a solo artist and collaborator that trace the history of African-American slave contributions to what is generally called American folk and country music. She was profiled in a Rolling Stone feature called “Rewriting Country Music’s Racist History,” and an interview for NPR’s All Things Considered called “How Rhiannon Giddens Reconstructs Black Pain with the Banjo.”

Rhiannon Giddens

Singer, violinist, banjo player, actress, GRAMMY-winner, and 2017 MacArthur Foundation “Genius Grant” recipient, Giddens is a founding member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, and has released a succession of albums as a solo artist and collaborator that trace the history of African-American slave contributions to what is generally called American folk and country music. She was profiled in a Rolling Stone feature called “Rewriting Country Music’s Racist History,” and an interview for NPR’s All Things Considered called “How Rhiannon Giddens Reconstructs Black Pain with the Banjo.”

Claude Steele

A social psychologist, educator, and author, Steele is the Dean Emeritus of Stanford Graduate School of Education and Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences Emeritus at Stanford. He is the former executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of California, Berkeley, and was provost of Columbia University. Steele is the author of the 2010 book Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do, a work focused on stereotype threats in relation to minority underperformance in higher education. He is an SFJAZZ Board trustee.

Claude Steele

A social psychologist, educator, and author, Steele is the Dean Emeritus of Stanford Graduate School of Education and Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences Emeritus at Stanford. He is the former executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of California, Berkeley, and was provost of Columbia University. Steele is the author of the 2010 book Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do, a work focused on stereotype threats in relation to minority underperformance in higher education. He is an SFJAZZ Board trustee.

ABOUT SFJAZZ

SFJAZZ is the largest non-profit jazz presenter in the world. Originally founded in 1983 as a small two-day festival, SFJAZZ now serves over 250,000 fans and students every year through its year-round concert, commissioning, and education programs. Born out of the COVID-19 crisis as a way to support artists and the organization, SFJAZZ Digital was launched, featuring exclusive online access to weekly 'Fridays At Five' archival broadcasts, on-demand concerts, and new livestream performances from the SFJAZZ Center.

Explore SFJAZZ Digital

ABOUT SFJAZZ

SFJAZZ is the largest non-profit jazz presenter in the world. Originally founded in 1983 as a small two-day festival, SFJAZZ now serves over 250,000 fans and students every year through its year-round concert, commissioning, and education programs. Born out of the COVID-19 crisis as a way to support artists and the organization, SFJAZZ Digital was launched, featuring exclusive online access to weekly 'Fridays At Five' archival broadcasts, on-demand concerts, and new livestream performances from the SFJAZZ Center.

Explore SFJAZZ Digital

BECOME A DIGITAL MEMBER

From the greatest jazz hall in the world straight to your living room, SFJAZZ Digital membership provides exclusive online access to the most memorable moments and new performances from the SFJAZZ Center. Become an SFJAZZ Digital Member today for just $5 per month, or $50 annually and enjoy access to all 'Fridays At Five'

BECOME A DIGITAL MEMBER

From the greatest jazz hall in the world straight to your living room, SFJAZZ Digital membership provides exclusive online access to the most memorable moments and new performances from the SFJAZZ Center. Become an SFJAZZ Digital Member today for just $5 per month, or $50 annually and enjoy access to all 'Fridays At Five'

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